Two centres for people with disabilities have registrations cancelled

HIQA says eight inspection reports found a 'good level' of compliance

Two centres for people with disabilities have registrations cancelled

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Two centres that provide residential services for people with disabilities have had their registrations cancelled by HIQA.

The Health Information and Quality Authority has published 18 reports on residential services for people with disabilities.

The reports refer to centres operated by the Health Service Executive (HSE).

HIQA says eight of the inspection reports found a 'good level' of compliance with requirements.

But the body says it cancelled the registration of two of the centres which had previously been operated by other providers.

One was previously operated by the Irish Society for Autism and the other centre was formerly operated by Camphill Communities Ireland.

HIQA says following these cancellations, the HSE took over the operating of the centres.

However, inspectors found that there continued to be "major non-compliances" in these centres, in key areas such as ensuring the safety of residents through appropriate safeguarding practices, and governance and management.

Twelve reports published refer to centres in the northwest of the country.

HIQA says that due to previous high levels of non-compliance in HSE centres in the northwest, it undertook a programme in December 2016 and which ended in June 2017 to ensure the quality of service provided in the areas had improved.

It says: "Substantial improvements were found in HSE centres in the northwest, with two of these centres found to be fully compliant at the time of inspection, with no actions required."

However, inspectors continued to identify areas of non-compliance that were impacting on the quality of life for residents in eight of the reports.

"Areas that required significant improvement included staffing levels appropriate to the assessed support and care needs of residents, written agreements between the residents and the centre, staff documentation and training for staff."

HIQA adds that some of the centres did not have Garda Síochána vetting disclosures available on the day of inspection, and not all staff had up-to-date training in line with residents' needs.