35 US-born children adopted by Irish families in the last four years

Children's Minister Katherine Zappone continues a visit to New York

35 US-born children adopted by Irish families in the last four years

Chief Executive of the Irish Adoption Authority Patricia Carey, Minister Katherine Zappone and Chair of the Authority Geoffrey Shannon in Manhattan following the successful review of an international adoption deal | Image: Supplied

The Department of Children has revealed that 35 US-born children have been adopted by Irish families under an international agreement.

The figures were released as Children's Minister Katherine Zappone continues a visit to New York.

An international Adoption Agreement has allowed 35 American-born children to be adopted by Irish families during the past four years.

Minister Zappone has been briefed on the impact of the Irish-American agreement during discussions with the Irish Adoption Authority in New York.

The authority is in the US for an annual review of the arrangement, which has been in operation since 2013.

Speaking following the briefing, Minister Zappone said: "Every child deserves a loving and safe home - and distance should be no object in achieving that goal.

"The Irish Adoption Authority under the Chair of Dr Geoffrey Shannon and the leadership of CEO Patricia Carey are to be congratulated for having the vision to put in place our arrangement with the United States.

"For 35 children from New York, Florida, California and Pennsylvania the agreement has meant a new life in Ireland.

"One can only imagine the hope, joy and love that each of these adoptions represents."

She says most of the children are just six months old when placed with their Irish family.

Minister Zappone is leading a delegation from the Child and Family Agency Tusla, gardaí, the Department of Justice and Special Rapporteur on Child Protection Geoffrey Shannon to meet their counterparts in New York.

She has also addressed a special session of the United Nations Security Council on Children in Armed Conflict.