WATCH: Controversial US tax reform bill passes second Senate vote

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was passed by 51 votes to 48

WATCH: Controversial US tax reform bill passes second Senate vote

United States President Donald Trump with Vice-President Mike Pence at a lunch with four veterans of Afghanistan in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC in July 2017 | Image: Ron Sachs/DPA/PA Images

A controversial tax reform bill in the US has passed a second vote by the Senate there.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was passed by 51 votes to 48.

The final count was read by US Vice-President Mike Pence, to several shouts from protesters.


US President Donald Trump simply tweeted this gif:


The bill will now be sent to the desk of Mr Trump, to be signed into law.

The bill was passed earlier on Tuesday, but technical changes were made to it so it had to go back for a re-vote.

It is seen as the biggest overhaul of the US tax code in 30 years.

The US$1.5tn (€1.26tn) bill will see a cut in taxes for corporations and the wealthy while giving mixed, temporary tax relief to middle-class Americans.

It will see the corporate tax rate slashed from 35% to 20%.

Mr Trump had talked of a tax cut for middle-class Americans during his 2016 campaign.

The tax reductions for big businesses will see $1.4tn (€1.17tn) added to the national debt over the next 10 years, which the president and his fellow Republicans believe will boost an already growing economy.

Republicans see the tax overhaul as crucial to their prospects in the mid-term elections in November 2018 - when they will have to defend their majorities in Congress.

This is despite public protests against it and polls showing little public enthusiasm for the measure.

According to an analysis by the US Tax Policy Centre, the bill "would reduce taxes on average for all income groups in both 2018 and 2025.

"In general, higher income households receive larger average tax cuts as a percentage of after-tax income, with the largest cuts as a share of income going to taxpayers in the 95th to 99th percentiles of the income distribution.

It adds: "On average, in 2027 taxes would change little for lower- and middle-income groups and decrease for higher-income groups."

It says that compared to current law, 5% of taxpayers would pay more tax in 2018, 9% in 2025, and 53% in 2027.