PICTURES: Ceremonies take place to remember those who died during 1916 Rising

Wreaths were laid at key locations in in Glasnevin Cemetery

PICTURES: Ceremonies take place to remember those who died during 1916 Rising

President Michael D Higgins lays a wreath at the GPO in Dublin's O'Connell Street | Image via @merrionstreet on Twitter

Updated: 13.00

Ceremonies have been held to remember those who died in the 1916 Easter Rising.

Commemorations took place outside the GPO in Dublin to remember those who died in the 1916 Rising.

President Michael D Higgins and Taoiseach Leo Varadkar attended the ceremony, which began with a reading of the Proclamation of Independence.

A minute silence was also held, the end of which was marked by a muffled drumbeat.

Defence Forces Personnel, including a brass band, a pipe band and representatives of the Army and the Naval Service took part in the ceremony - which concluded with an Air Corps fly past.

Image via @merrionstreet on Twitter

The National Flag was lowered and the 1916 Proclamation was read by an officer from the Defence Forces at noon.

President Higgins then laid a wreath to commemorate those who died.

Today marks the 102nd anniversary of the Easter Rising.

Captain Seán McCarthy of the Irish Air Corps reads the Proclamation outside the GPO | Image via @merrionstreet on Twitter

Separately, Heritage Minister Josepha Madigan laid a wreath at a ceremony in Glasnevin Cemetery to commemorate all of those who died.

Minister Madigan said: "It is a great honour for me to represent the Government at this ceremony of remembrance to commemorate all those who died in the cause of Irish freedom during Easter Week 1916.

"We remember in a special way those who rest in peace in this cemetery and the creators of our two great symbols of nationhood."

Image: Fennell Photography

She was joined by Ms Sarah Tiffan, deputy head of Mission at the British embassy, Ambassador Stéphane Crouzat on behalf of the French embassy and members of the Irish Defence Forces and Chairman of Glasnevin Trust, John Green.

Commenting on the remembrance ceremony, Minister Madigan said: "It is a great honour for me to represent the Government at this ceremony of remembrance to commemorate all those who died in the cause of Irish freedom during Easter Week 1916.

"We remember in a special way those who rest in peace in this cemetery and the creators of our two great symbols of nationhood."

Tributes were also paid to Peadar Kearney and Edward Hollywood.

Image: Fennell Photography

Mr Hollywood brought the Tricolour to Ireland from France, with its message of reconciliation and friendship.

Mr Kearney wrote the original English lyrics of 'The Soldier's Song' in 1907.

The translation of his song - Amhrán na bhFiann - has been the Irish National Anthem since 1926.

Minister Madigan said: "The pride and respect that we feel for our flag is at the heart of our identity as Irish people and a powerful symbol of our commitment to promoting peace and mutual understanding among all communities.

"This year, as we remember the significant milestones reached in 1918 on the long and difficult journey towards enfranchising men and women equally and the full inclusion of women in political life, it is fitting that we also pay a special tribute to Dora Sigerson.

Image: Fennell Photography

"She was a gifted sculptor and a major figure of the Irish Literary Revival who designed this beautiful memorial to honour those who gave their lives in the pursuit of self-determination and nationhood."

The centrepiece of the events at Glasnevin was the raising of the Tricolour at 9:40am over the Sigerson Monument by members of the Irish Defence Forces.

The national anthem was played by a lone piper in the main courtyard of the cemetery.