Tuam historian Catherine Corless to receive human rights award

The Bar of Ireland is honouring Catherine for her "tireless work in relation to the Tuam Mother and Baby Home"

Tuam historian Catherine Corless to receive human rights award

Local Tuam historian Catherine Corless, pictured beside a grotto in the grounds where the unmarked mass grave containing the remains of nearly 800 infants. Photo: Laura Hutton/RollingNews.ie

The Bar of Ireland has announced that Tuam amateur historian Catherine Corless will receive its Human Rights Award for 2017.

The association of barristers says the award is "in recognition of her tireless work in relation to the Tuam Mother and Baby Home".

In 2014, Catherine published research revealing that hundreds of babies & toddlers had been buried in unmarked graves at the Tuam Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home.

The home operated between 1925 and 1961 in the Co Galway town.

The research prompted the launch of a statutory commission of investigation.

In March, the inquiry team confirmed that 'significant quantities' of human remains had been discovered at the site.

The remains were found in what is believed to have been a septic tank, as had suggested in Mrs Corless' article.

Speaking to The Daily Beast earlier this year about how she encountered various roadblocks during her initial investigation, Mrs Corless said: "When I wasn’t being taken seriously locally, that really got me very, very angry and I think that is what drove me just to try and seek more information and to find answers and just bring some justice."

Catherine is due to receive the Bar of Ireland’s Human Rights Award at a ceremony in Dublin next week.

Last year, the Irish Naval Service received the award for its work in saving thousands of lives in the Mediterranean during the migration crisis.