Majority think sending Christmas cards is an important tradition

Some 68% say they would prefer to receive a handwritten card

Majority think sending Christmas cards is an important tradition

File photo

A new survey finds three-quarters of Irish adults believe sending Christmas cards is an "important and worthwhile tradition".

While over half of the population see the ritual of writing cards as a moment of mindfulness at a busy time.

The research from An Post has looked into the Christmas card writing habits of the nation.

Some 68% of those surveyed revealed that they would prefer to receive a handwritten Christmas card from a loved one or friend.

Looking more closely at the age breakdown, 70% of 45 to 54-year-olds agree with the statement, while two-thirds of 18 to 24-year-olds prefer to receive a handwritten card.

An Post says: "This statistic is particularly interesting considering digital communications usually dominate for this demographic."

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Just 5% of the population would prefer to receive a Christmas message in a text, social media message or e-mail.

When asked who is the first person they receive a Christmas card from every year, almost one-quarter agreed that extended family (grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin) were first through the letterbox, followed closely in second by a parent at 20% and friends at 19%.

A very low percentage, just 7%, of those surveyed said that they did not receive a Christmas card.

An Post says: "The overall consensus is that across the board, the tradition of sending and receiving handwritten cards is important and still extremely relevant to people in Ireland - younger, older; male and female."

It is reminding people that the latest guaranteed date for posting cards across Europe including Britain is Monday December 18th; December 19th for Northern Ireland and December 20th for the Republic of Ireland.