An Foclóir Aiteach: First English-Irish LGBTQ dictionary launched

The dictionary contains over 100 translated words and terms

An Foclóir Aiteach: First English-Irish LGBTQ dictionary launched

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A new LGBTQ dictionary for the Irish language has been launched in Dublin City University (DCU).

It is part of a collaboration between the Union of Students in Ireland (USI), BelonG To Youth Services and the Transgender Equality Network of Ireland (TENI).

It also has the support of Minister of State at the Department of Culture with responsibility for Gaeilge, Joe McHugh.

Called The Queer Dictionary, which translates as 'An Foclóir Aiteach', it is the first of its kind in Ireland with over 100 words and terms translated.

Image: usi.ie

It includes terms like gay (aerach), intersex (idirghnéas), closeted (faoi choim - which translates as 'under a cloak') and drag queen (banríon draig).

USI President Michael Kerrigan, said: "We believe that everyone should be able to recognise themselves in any language, and that they would be able to describe themselves in any language.

"A lack of representative terminology for the LGBTQA community in the Irish language is a problem that needed to be addressed.

"This new queer Irish language dictionary is a resource for members of the LGBTQA community by translating terminology into the Irish language, and a positive step forward for the Irish language to be part of people’s identities."

Some of the terms in the new LGBTQ dictionary | Image: usi.ie

Minister McHugh said: "It is important to keep the language alive and there’s something nice about bringing it from the bottom up.

"I think it's very clever, an cliste, way of doing it.

"You are adding to the language, strengthening it. This kind of initiative does keep the language alive, and close to the heart.

"There’s a big debate going on all the time about the Irish language - are we doing enough as a Government - but it is all our responsibility.

"What we have to do as Irish people is make a decision that we are going to use the language a little bit everyday and this goes to the heart of that cause."

Moninne Griffith, executive director of BeLonG To Youth Services, added: "The launch of 'An Foclóir Aiteach' means that members of the LGBTI+ community here in Ireland will no longer be stuck for words in our native language.

"We now have words and phrases which allow individuals to express who they are, and how they identify, in a meaningful and accurate way."

More information and the dictionary itself can be found here