Eight unusual twists for this year's pancakes

Drop that lemon and keep the sugar in the cupboard... It's time to re-think the pancake

As we all sit down tomorrow to celebrate the day the apostles established a side-business selling pancakes to punters at the sermon on the mount, we'll no doubt ponder that great question: is there a world beyond lemon juice, sugar and Nutella?

Those of you who dare to dream will be glad to hear there is. Here's some alternative pancakes for tomorrow's festivities:

  

(dulicious.com)

Red velvet

A sure-fire way to make any cake more appealing is to turn it into a red velvet cake. So why not try the same with your pancakes?

Creme egg

Rather than whisking it in with the rest of them, try breaking up a creme egg and spreading it over the pancake while it's still in the pan. 

Peanut butter and jam

Pancakes are a staple of any American breakfast, so take a leaf from their cookbook and try the classic peanut butter and jam (you don't have to call it jelly.)

(goodlifeeats.com)

Ricotta and Raspberry

If you're feeling fancy, this mixture of creamy cheese and fresh forest fruit should do the trick. Very dainty altogether.

Caramelised apple and rashers

Mixing the sweet and savoury is a daring move, but only through such risks can progress be made in pancake-ology. Luckily someone's taken the risk on this one before you and has determined that it's delicious.

(the-baker-chick.com)

Creme brulee

And if you're feeling even fancier, and really want to impress, stack a pile of pancakes and make a creme brulee cake. Sure it might take two hours, but Pancake Tuesday comes but once a year.

Chicken curry

Why limit yourself to sweet pancakes? It is a full pancake day, so help yourself to dinner with a delicious pancake chicken curry. You could even use the leftovers from your last Indian take-away.

Haddock

So it goes that English writer Arnold Bennett was staying at the Savoy in London, and was so enamoured with the chefs' new haddock and cheese-based meal, that he would order it wherever he travelled. And why should it remain the diet of obscure but prolific English novelists? Gordon Ramsey will guide you to making your own.