Ted Radio Hour: Spirit of Inquiry

In this week's show, TED speakers explore how a deeper and more humble style of inquiry may help achieve the next big breakthrough.


The force behind scientific progress is the simple act of asking questions.This episode, TED speakers explore how a deeper and more humble style of inquiry may help achieve the next big breakthrough.

 When Michael Stevens is confronted with a quirky question, he responsibly searches for the answer and posts it to YouTube -- inviting millions of people to follow his journey of discovery. 

In school, we're taught that we should trust science because the scientific method leads to measurable results and hard facts. But Naomi Oreskes  says the process of inquiry doesn't end there.

Sometimes, doctors just don't have the answers. Surgeon Kevin Jones says having the humility to acknowledge this leads to better medicine.

Former President of Bennington College Liz Coleman believes higher education has become overly-specialized and complacent. She says we need to encourage students to ask bigger questions and take more risks. 

Trained as a neuroscientist, Eric Haseltine  is always asking questions. He has identified four concepts that lead to scientific breakthrough. One of them: acknowledging we're not the center of the universe.