What next for Shane Lowry?

Lawrence Donegan speaks to Off The Ball about his performance and how the Offaly native will move on from his US Open final defeat

Shane Lowry

Image: Charlie Riedel / AP/Press Association Images

Shane Lowry surrendered a four shot lead heading into the final day of the US Open as Dustin Johnson seized momentum at Oakmont. 

The Offaly man was inconsolable after his round and knows the magnitude of the oppourtunity he let get away from him.

Speaking on tonight's Off The Ball golf journalist Lawrence Donegan explained that this will benefit Lowry in the long run.

"The first thing is that [the weekend] was a fantastic performance. If you follow golf closely, it's very seldom when a guy gets himself into that sort of position for the first one. It's actually seldom of a guy who gets himself there goes on to win.

"The process is you have to put yourself in position a handful of times before you win it. He said that it was all going a bit too quickly, but that's what is going to happen the next couple of times.

"He will have learned a lot from yesterday and play with a lot more control and will be able to slow things down. If you look at the history of these things, it takes a few gos. 

"This is a guy who is a top, top player. He'll be around in the top ten or 15 for a long time. He has a game and isn't afraid to put himself in these sort of positions.

"It'll be no comfort to him but this will be a learning experience for him. He's not alone in the world of professional golf when you have to go through something like that. Look at Rory McIlroy four shots ahead on the final day of the 2010 Masters. Three months later he came back to win the US Open."

The farce that was Dustin Johnson's stroke penalty sullied the final round, as the USGA refused to take decisive action and deduct a stroke from his score during the American's final round.

"You could always trust the USGA to mess things up. They are ostensibly a professional organisation but really they are run by amateurs.

"They do two major golf tournaments a year, the women's US Open and the men's US Open. But other than that, they're just a bunch of bluebloods... The people who run it are just a disgrace really."