Morning top 5: Bus Éireann strike enters 9th day; financial disclosures of top Trump aides released

The top stories this Saturday morning...

More wildcat industrial action at Bus Éireann is likely next week if no progress is made.

The main strike is now into its ninth day, with workers refusing to accept proposed cost-cutting measures at the company.

Secondary pickets yesterday brought Irish Rail and Dublin Bus to a standstill during the morning rush hour yesterday morning.

They say the action was organised without the unions and was a bid to highlight the issue and bring both sides back to talks.

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It is hoped attempts can be made today to lift the wreckage of downed helicopter Rescue 116.

A specialist salvage tug has arrived in the waters around Blacksod with the intention of lifting the helicopter.

Sea conditions have hampered the retrieval effort over the past week.

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The deaths of two people who drowned in the River Shannon yesterday are being treated as accidental.

Two bodies were recovered in Carrick on Shannon in the afternoon after it was reported people had entered the water.

The bodies have been removed to Sligo University Hospital where a post mortem will be carried out on Monday.

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The White House has publicly released the financial disclosures of top officials in the Trump administration.

The publicly released files show Jared Kushner, and his wife Ivanka Trump, are holding on to scores of real estate investments as they serve in White House roles - assets which are part of a portfolio worth at least $240m.

However, The New York Times reports the couple's empire could be far bigger than this, with a value of up to $741m.

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Violent protests have erupted in Paraguay after lawmakers secretly voted in favour of a constitutional amendment allowing the country's president to seek re-election.

Demonstrators stormed Congress and set fire to the building - and footage showed protesters smashing windows, burning tyres and clashing with police.

Riot officers used water cannon, tear gas and rubber bullets to try and bring the unruly crowds under control.