France marks first anniversary of Paris attacks

Sting headlined a concert to mark the reopening of the Bataclan concert hall

France marks first anniversary of Paris attacks

A woman lights a candle outside the Bataclan concert hall in Paris. Picture by Kamil Zihnioglu AP/Press Association Images

France is today marking one year since the Paris attacks, in which 130 people were killed by Islamist terrorists.

Attackers carried out mass shootings and suicide bombings at public places including cafés, restaurants, a concert venue and outside a football stadium.

This morning, plaques are being laid at six locations across Paris.

The plaques are being unveiled by President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo.

Last night, Sting headlined a concert to mark the reopening of the Bataclan concert hall - where 89 of the victims died.

The musician said the concert was to “honour” those killed in the attack a year ago with all proceeds from the show to be donated to charity organisations.

"In re-opening the Bataclan, we have two important tasks to reconcile,” he said in a statement on his website.

“First, to remember and honour those who lost their lives in the attack a year ago and second, to celebrate the life and the music that this historic theatre represents. In doing so, we hope to respect the memory as well as the life affirming spirit of those who fell. We shall not forget them."

British musician Sting performs on stage at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris. Picture by Christophe Ena AP/Press Association Images

However, the event was marred by controversy.

The lead singer of Eagles of Death Metal, Jesse Hughes, and another member of the band were reportedly refused entry to the event.

The band were on stage when the attack began, one year ago.

Hughes has provoked anger in France, by suggesting that Muslim members of staff at the Bataclan may have helped the terrorists. He later apologised for the accusation.

He has also suggested that US-style gun laws would have prevented many of the deaths.

Bataclan co-director Jules Frutos told AFP: "They came, I threw them out - there are things you can't forgive. He makes these incredibly false declarations every two months.

"It is madness, accusing our security of being complicit with the terrorists... Enough. Zero. This has to stop."