Trump's transition website claims he owns buildings that he doesn't

His website suggests he owns properties in Turkey and Brazil

President-elect Donald Trump transition website is laying out his long-term plans - as well as making some false claims.

The new site, greatagain.gov, said until Friday afternoon that he owned at least four properties in Azerbaijan, Turkey, Brazil and Panama, despite ownership previously being denied by the Trump Organisation.

The transition site, which was launched this week, also claimed he owned six towers in Manhattan, despite only having partial or negligible interest.

There's been confusion surrounding Trump's property portfolio for a while, and a lack of a discernment between what buildings he owns and which ones simply bear his name. Trump expanded his footprint by trading his brand for licensing and management fees, without having to invest in or construct the buildings.

Bloomberg reports that before the revision the website read: "The Trump organisation owns some of the world's top properties, including, among many others, the world-renowned Fifth Avenue skyscraper, Trump Tower, as well as Trump Parc, Trump Palace, Trump Plaza, the Trump World Tower, Trump Park Avenue, and, most recently, the transformation of the Old Post Office Building in Washington."

It also said he owns properties in Brazil, Canada, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Panama, Scotland, Ireland and other locations. However, the Trump Organisation site said he doesn't own the branded properties in Brazil, Turkey or Panama. His supposed project in Azerbaijan also has a local owner and developer. 

Yesterday, Trump rowed back on his promise to repeal 'Obamacare', saying he will consider leaving certain parts of the act in place.

In his first interview since the election, Trump told the Wall Street Journal he planned to move "quickly" on the president's health initiative, which he argued has become so unworkable and expensive that “you can’t use it.”

However, he also showed a willingness to preserve at least two provisions of the health care system and admitted he favours keeping the ban against denial of coverage by insurers based on patients' existing conditions.