Syrian refugee and daughters found dead in Danish freezer

Danish police are searching for the woman's husband in connection with the murders

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File photo. Image: Michael Probst / AP/Press Association Images

Danish police say they have found the bodies of a slain Syrian refugee and her two young daughters in a freezer.

They discovered the bodies of the 27-year-old and her two daughters, aged 7 and 9 in a freezer in an apartment in Aabenraa in southern Denmark. 

Authorities have since launched a manhunt for the girls' father. 

They made the discovery Sunday night in an apartment in southern Denmark. Police said they were contacted by a member of the woman’s family police after he had not been able to reach her for several days.

The family arrived in Denmark in 2015 and received refugee status.

In 2015, the Scandinavian country welcomed 21,000 migrants. However, Denmark's re-established border controls at the start of the year has seen this influx slow considerable. 

The law enacted in January empowers Danish authorities to seize any assets exceeding $1,450 from asylum-seekers in order to help pay for the migrants’ subsistence in the country (items of “sentimental value,” such as wedding rings, are exempt). It also extends, from one year to three, the period that those who are resettled must wait to apply for family members to join them in Denmark.

Last month, nationalists in Denmark prompted outrage after handing out 'refugee spray'.

The Danes' Party, which was founded by a former Neo-Nazi, said the substance was a legal alternative to pepper spray, which is outlawed in country. 

The organisation has previously called for all non-Western immigrants to be kicked out of the country.

The law empowers Danish authorities to seize any assets exceeding $1,450 from asylum-seekers in order to help pay for the migrants’ subsistence in the country (items of “sentimental value,” such as wedding rings, are exempt). It also extends, from one year to three, the period that those who are resettled must wait to apply for family members to join them in Denmark.