Donald Trump takes rare swipe at US First Lady Michelle Obama

He criticised Mrs Obama for campaigning for his rival, Hillary Clinton

Donald Trump takes rare swipe at US First Lady Michelle Obama

First Lady Michelle Obama delivers a speech at North Point Community Church in Alpharetta, Georgia in 2011 | Image: Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

Donald Trump has taken a rare swipe at the Michelle Obama, saying "all she wants to do is campaign" for his rival.

The presidential candidate has avoided directly hitting out at the first lady for much of the race.

But at a campaign rally in North Carolina, Mr Trump had a change of heart.

He accused Mrs Obama of attacking his rival during the 2008 primaries.

He said she was alluding to Mrs Clinton when she said that if you "can't run your own house," you can't run the White House.

Although the first lady did make that comment, the White House has vehemently denied that it was a reference to the Clintons, instead insisting it was about their own attempts to balance family and politics.

Mr Trump also complained that "all she (Michelle Obama) wants to do is campaign".

Mrs Obama has slammed Mr Trump both indirectly and directly on multiple occasions during the presidential campaign.

In an emotional speech which went viral last week, she addressed the now infamous footage in which the Republican nominee brags about women letting him kiss and grope them because he is famous.

Mrs Obama, speaking at a Mrs Clinton rally in New Hampshire, said Mr Trump's "obscene" comments had shaken her "to my core".

She continued: "This was a powerful individual speaking freely and openly about sexually predatory behaviour."

The first lady also hit out at Trump's refusal to say whether he will accept the outcome of the election if Mrs Clinton wins.

She said his comments threatened "the very idea of America itself".

Mrs Clinton echoed the first lady's words at a rally in Cleveland on Friday, saying Mr Trump is "threatening our democracy".

She said the "peaceful transition of power is one of the things that sets us apart", adding that America knows the "difference between leadership and dictatorship".

Both candidates were back on the campaign trail on Friday, a day after they traded insults at a charity dinner in New York.