Evening top 5: Government to appeal Apple ruling; Ian Bailey and the French trial

Friday's big stories

Finance Minister Michael Noonan has branded an EU Commission ruling on Apple tax in Ireland as "bizarre and outrageous".

His comments come after Cabinet members unanimously agreed to appeal the ruling.

The comission is ordering Ireland to recoup up to €13bn in back taxes from the tech firm. 

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A lawyer for Ian Bailey has predicted he will be handed a 30-year prison sentence in absentia in France.

Mr Bailey's lawyer, Dominique Tricaud, predicts his client will be convicted of voluntary homicide over the killing of Sophie Toscan du Plantier.

This is the maximum sentence for this unpremeditated murder charge under French law.

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Colleagues of Trevor O’Neill, who worked for the Drainage Division in Dublin City Council and was tragically killed in Spain last month, have set up a fund to assist his young family.  

The Trevor O’Neill Memorial Fund has been established with the kind assistance of Dubco Credit Union.

The money will be used to support his partner Suzanne and their three young children with the many difficulties they will face in the months and years ahead.

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Ireland's bid to host the Rugby World Cup 2023 has moved into a key stage, as World Rugby continue to gather information about the four countries who have made their bids to host the tournament.

Of the four hopeful nations, only Ireland and Italy have never hosted the event.

Ireland did host games in 1991 and 1999. South Africa held it in 1995, while France were hosts in 2007.

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An Irish passport has recently become a valuable commodity across the pond as the confusion over post-Brexit conditions are yet to be confirmed.

There is no indication when Article 50 will be triggered which has left the E.U. in a state of uncertainty regarding its future relationship with Britain.

In turn, the British public don't know the full cost of "taking back control" of their borders as their free travel arrangements in the E.U. may well be coming to an end.