Normandy attacker finally buried after Muslim leaders refused

The burial of the other attacker, Abdelmalik Petitjean, remains the subject of a dispute

Normandy attacker finally buried after Muslim leaders refused

Flowers left outside the church in Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, Normandy where the attack took place. Image: Francois Mori / AP/Press Association Images

One of the jihadists who killed a priest inside a church near the French city of Rouen has finally been buried.

Adel Kermiche was buried around 100km away from the city in an area on the outskirts of Paris, after local Muslim leaders refused to get involved.

The 19-year-old and his accomplice, Abdelmalik Petitjean, were shot dead by police in July after storming a service in Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray and taking hostages.

During the siege, they slit the throat of 84-year-old priest Jacques Hamel and seriously injured another hostage.

Both men had pledged allegiance to Islamic State.

Kermiche was buried on Friday evening in a multi-faith cemetery in the Puiseux-Pontoise suburb, northwest of Paris, after Muslim leaders near Rouen had refused to grant Kermiche a Muslim burial.

An official said: "All we did was strictly apply the law. The family owns a crypt in the cemetery and the law guarantees the right to be buried regardless of the circumstances surrounding the person's death."

Muslim community leaders said they did not want to "taint" Islam by being associated with Kermiche.

The burial of the other attacker, Abdelmalik Petitjean, remains the subject of a dispute. The mayors of the two areas where he was born and where he lived are refusing to allow his funeral to take place on their turf.

France has faced a conundrum on where to bury jihadists responsible for a string of attacks in recent months. There are fears that the graves of jihadists could become sites of pilgrimage for other extremists.