EgyptAir cockpit voice recorder indicates 'attempts to put out fire before crash'

Investigation comittee continue to reveal more details of the crashed flight

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An EgyptAir Airbus A330-300 takes off for Cairo from Charles de Gaulle Airport outside of Paris | Image: Christophe Ena / AP/Press Association Images

Updated: 19.45

The flight deck recorder of EgyptAir flight MS804 suggests attempts were made to put out a fire on board, investigation committee sources have indicated.

The Airbus A320 crashed into the Mediterranean during a flight from Paris to Cairo on 19 May, killing all 66 people on board.

The cause of the crash remains unknown.

Audio from the flight deck voice recorder is reportedly in line with data from a repaired black box of the jet which confirmed last month that there was smoke in aircraft.

The Egyptian investigation committee looking into the incident said soot had also been found on a piece of wreckage from the plane, which showed signs of high temperature damage.

Sources added that the investigation committee remains open to all possibilities regarding the cause of crash.

The recorder was taken to Cairo this week after being repaired in France, and reportedly also indicates that a fire took hold of the plane in its final moments.

Aviation officials believe it was down to a fault in the plane's technical systems rather than sabotage.

There was no distress call from the aircraft and no group has ever claimed that it brought it down.

Flight deck recordings usually capture pilot conversations and any cockpit alarms.

On Monday, a search vessel recovered human remains from the underwater crash site.

The investigation committee said the remains would be handed over to coroners and prosecution officials.

The Paris prosecutor's office has opened a manslaughter investigation, saying last week that it was not looking into terrorism as a possible cause of the crash.