Disabled toddler who has stopped smiling should be let die, British judge rules

Two-year-old's incurable condition has been deteriorating

Disabled toddler who has stopped smiling should be let die, British judge rules

File photo: CDC/Amanda Mills

A British hospital can provide only palliative care to a little boy suffering from a neurological disorder, the UK's High Court judge has ruled.

The two-year-old's condition, which is described as incurable but unidentified, has been deteriorating.

NHS bosses argued that limiting treatment to palliative care would be lawful and in the child's best interests.

Specialists said "further invasive interventions" would have little or no therapeutic benefit, and be distressing for him.

He had stopped smiling, nurses said, and grimaced rather than giggled when he was tickled.

But his parents disagreed with the idea of implementing an "end-of-life plan", and wanted all treatment options to continue to be available.

His mother told Mrs Justice Parker that she visited her son every day, describing him as an "angel".

She said he still smiled, and that hospital staff had mistaken his smiles for grimaces.

"Give this little boy a chance to live," she told the judge.

"They do not have any proof that he is dying."