Plaque unveiled to commemorate Charlie Hebdo attacks, with victim's name misspelled

12 people were killed when Islamist gunmen opened fire

Plaque unveiled to commemorate Charlie Hebdo attacks, with victim's name misspelled

Irish Times editor Kevin O'Sullivan (grey coat) holding 'Je Suis Charlie' placards with members and supporters of the National Union of Journalists at a ceremony in Dublin Castle | Image: RollingNews.ie

A plaque has been unveiled in Paris to commemorate one year since a terror attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

12 people were killed when Islamist gunmen opened fire at the office in the French capital.

11 victims were shot dead inside the building, and a police officer was also killed outside.

However, AFP reports that the name of one of the victims - cartoonist Georges Wolinski - has been misspelled on the plaque as 'Wolinsky'.

It is believed the plaque will now be replaced.

It comes as one million copies of a special issue of the French satirical magazine are being published to mark the anniversary.

The special edition will be released on January 6th - a day before the anniversary - and feature cartoons from staff that died in the attacks, as well as new cartoons and messages of support.

The popularity of the magazine has soared since the attacks. Sales are reported to have jumped tenfold - with more than 180,000 subscribers.

The increased circulation came after 7.5 million copies of the first issue released after the attack were sold.

The issue controversially featured a front page cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad holding a sign reading 'Je Suis Charlie' - the slogan that went viral on social media in the aftermath of the attack.

A total of 17 people died in the three days of attacks, including at a kosher supermarket.