Australian anti-immigration senator wears burka before delivering speech

Pauline Hanson is calling for the garment to be banned

Australian anti-immigration senator wears burka before delivering speech

Senator Pauline Hanson wears a burqa during question time in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia | Image: Jed Cooper/AP/Press Association Images

An Australian anti-immigration senator has sparked controversy after wearing a burka in the Senate there.

Pauline Hanson is leader of the far-right One Nation party.

She previously said Australia was in danger of being swamped by Asians.

She has called for the Islamic garment to be banned, linking it to terrorism and security concerns.

"While it is an offence in most States of Australia to be disguised with unlawful intent, it is self-evident that the two years in jail is not a deterrent for a suicide bomber.

"We need laws to stop terrorism before it happens and the ability of others to see a face is an important part of assessing risk."

"Full face coverings, like a niqab or burka, take away a valuable source of information from counter terrorism experts.

"Full face coverings deny us all the right to be as safe as we can be in public places."

Senator Pauline Hanson (front) removes a burqa she wore during question time in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia | Image: Jed Cooper/AP/Press Association Images

"If the burka was a religious requirement then it would not have been banned in public places in Islamic countries.

"The fact is wearing a burka is not a religious requirement.

"Non-Islamic countries like Switzerland, Norway, Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, China and Russia have also banned full face coverings."

"Australians don’t like double standards. How can you justify the banning of a helmet or balaclavas but not a burqa when entering a bank."

"There is no place in Australia for migrants who want to come here and change the foundation stones of our way of life. My message to those who want to live under Sharia Law is to migrate to an Islamic country but don’t come here to Australia."

But Australia's Attorney-General, George Brandis, condemned the move: "I am not going to pretend to ignore the stunt that you have tried to pull today.

"And I would caution you and counsel you Senator Hanson, with respect, to be very, very careful of the offence you may do to the religious sensibilities of other Australians".

Additional reporting: Paul Quinn and Jack Quann