Morning top 5: Gardaí reviewing handling of Jobstown case; clashes in Hamburg ahead of G20 summit

The top stories this Friday morning...

Gardaí have begun an internal review into their handling of the Jobstown case.

An assistant commissioner is leading the review, which was set up the day after six protesters were acquitted of false imprisonment.

News of the probe emerged after Leo Varadkar said he expected the Garda Commissioner to look into how the case was handled.

One of the Jobstown six, Solidarity TD Paul Murphy, is welcoming the Taoiseach's comments - but says "Gardaí investigating Gardaí is clearly not a very sensible way to go about investigating it".

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US President Donald Trump and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin will have their first face to face encounter at the G20 summit in the German city of Hamburg today.

They have both said they want to repair ties between the two countries, which have been damaged by the Syria crisis and Russia's alleged meddling in the US election.

Meanwhile, 76 police have been injured during clashes ahead of the meeting of world leaders.

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The prosecution is due to call a psychiatric expert to give evidence this morning in the trial of a man accused of murdering his girlfriend in Sligo.

Oisín Conroy, who’s from Boyle in Co Roscommon, has pleaded not guilty to Natalie McGuinness’ murder by reason of insanity.

He admits strangling her at his apartment on Mail Coach Road in Sligo in October 2015 but claims he was having a psychotic episode at the time.

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US entertainer Bill Cosby will face a retrial in November.

The comedian faces accusations of drugging a woman before sexually assaulting her more than a decade ago.

Last month a jury failed to reach a verdict after deliberating for six days.

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Demands for a new funding model for Irish broadcasters steps up a gear today.

Ireland's media stakeholders will gather in Dublin to discuss how the sector can secure funding in an increasingly competitive market.

The current model is one of the few in the world which allows the state broadcaster obtain public funding as well as private advertising.