Gerry Adams: DUP deal "a blank cheque for a Tory Brexit"

The Sinn Féin leader says "the devil is in the detail" when it comes to promised extra funds for the North

Gerry Adams: DUP deal "a blank cheque for a Tory Brexit"

Gerry Adams. Picture by: Brian Lawless/PA Wire/PA Images

The Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams has said the deal between the DUP and the Conservatives provides a "blank cheque for a Tory Brexit which threatens the Good Friday Agreement".

Deputy Adams was responding after the deal was finalised earlier today.

The confidence and supply agreement will see additional funds provided for Northern Ireland, while the Conservatives will receive support from DUP MPs on crucial votes - on matters such as Brexit and budgets - in London.

British Prime Minister Theresa May insisted: "The agreement makes clear that we remain steadfast to our commitments as set out in the Belfast Agreement and its successors, and in governing in the interests of all parts of the community in Northern Ireland."

In a statement this afternoon, Deputy Adams said the DUP only has 'limited time' to deliver on a pledge to adhere fully to the Good Friday Agreement and restore power-sharing in the North.

He argued: “The Tory government has slashed more than £1 billion from the block grant over the last seven years. The allocation of additional funds could help to ease the enormous pressure on our public services. The devil is in the detail.

“Sinn Féin will continue to prioritise the establishment of a credible, sustainable Executive which deals with all the challenges facing our society, including the failure to implement previous agreements. Sinn Féin will vigorously pursue the rights of citizens currently being denied by the DUP and the British government."

He added: “If as they claim in today’s agreement, both the Tories and the DUP will fully adhere fully to the Good Friday Agreement and its successors, they need to deliver on this for the political institutions can be restored."

Negotiations to form a new Stormont executive are continuing in the North. Today, Foreign Affairs Minister Simon Coveney is in Belfast to help facilitate the negotiations.

He welcomed the DUP and Conservative parties' "recommitment to the Good Friday Agreement and its successors".