Morning top 5: Belgium foils terror plot; improved building standards; and Daniel Day-Lewis retires

The top stories this Wednesday morning

Belgian authorities say they have foiled a terror attack at Brussels Central Station.

A suspected suicide bomber was shot dead at the capital's busy train hub by soldiers yesterday evening.

They were on patrol inside at the time as the country is on high alert following attacks last year.

The suspect was initially reported to have been wearing an explosive belt and had wires coming out of his clothes, according to some media, although police say they are unable to comment on the reports.

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The UK Prime Minister Theresa May is under further pressure as she prepares to set out out the priorities for the next British parliament.

It comes as Mrs May is yet to clinch a deal with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to prop up her minority government.

Brexit is expected to be the main focus of Queen Elizabeth II's Speech later.

The British government also plans to set out the opportunities presented by the UK's departure from the European Union in order to construct a society which "works for everyone".

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The Dáil will debate measures today to improve building standards in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

The Green Party motion includes a proposal for an independent National Building Regulator.

It also wants building standards raised, and inspections increased.

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Irish people could end up paying more for their gas and electricity if the UK leaves the EU Internal Energy market.

Research published today by the ERSI re-evaluates Irish energy policy in light of Brexit, and makes recommendations for policymakers.

The energy systems of Ireland and the UK are closely linked, with Ireland's gas and electricity systems currently exclusively connected to Great Britain.

 

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Daniel Day-Lewis has shocked Hollywood by announcing he is quitting acting.

The 60-year-old was the first person to win three Best Actor Oscars.

A spokeswoman for the star told Variety magazine it was "a private decision".