Opening Bell: Hackers plan further NSA-powered attacks, Ford feels the squeeze, renters left behind

Get up to speed with today's breaking business news...

The 'WannaCry' global ransomware attack ran out of steam yesterday - but a follow-up attack may be on the way.

The Financial Times reports that more NSA documents are circulating on the deep web, in a story citing "six analysts and intelligence officials."

A US security tool called 'EsteemAudit' is expected to provide the blueprint for the next attack and up to a dozen NSA programmes are believed to be in circulation among hackers.

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A new study - carried out by the Simon Community - has found that the supply of housing for people receiving rent benefits is extremely low.

The organisation is launching its 'Locked out of the market' study this morning, which looked at 600 properties in 11 areas across the country.

The study found that 88% of the rental properties looked at are beyond the reach of Rent Supplement and the Housing Assistant Payments scheme.

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The Wall St Journal reports that Ford is set to reduce its global headcount by 10%.

The car company's first quarter adjusted earnings fell by 42% and CEO Mark Fields is under pressure to improve this performance. He's promised to cut costs by $3bn and that profits will recover in 2018.

According to the newspaper, this announcement could come as early as later in this week.

Despite its financial squeeze, the firm has continued to invest in self-driving cars, electronic technology, and ride sharing.

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A new proposed trade deal between the EU and Singapor could offer some clues as how the process of agreeing a post-Brexit trade deal with the UK will work.

The EU Court of Justice will decide today whether a new deal with Singapore must be ratified by national parliaments and regional assemblies across the Union.

Europe's Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada was almost derailed in October of last year when one Belgian assembly refused to sign it. That region eventually changed its mind.