Six male BBC presenters agree to pay cuts following gender pay gap revelations

Jeremy Vine said he supports his "female colleagues who've rightly said they should be paid the same"

Six male BBC presenters agree to pay cuts following gender pay gap revelations

File photo. Picture by: Edward Smith/EMPICS Entertainment

The BBC has confirmed that six of its male presenters have agreed to take pay cuts, amid the controversy over the gender pay gap at the corporation.

Huw Edwards, Nicky Campbell, John Humphrys, Jon Sopel, Nick Robinson and Jeremy Vine will all see their pay reduced.

All six men earned more than stg£200,000 (€228,000) in 2016-17.

Mr Vine - who hosts the quiz show Eggheads and a weekday lunchtime radio programme - was the highest earner of the six with a £700,000-749,000 (around €800,000-850,000) salary.

In a statement, the British broadcaster confirmed that the six presenters have agreed that their pay will now be reduced.

The statement says: "These are great journalists and presenters, who have a real connection with the audience. We are proud to have them working at the BBC.

"The final details of some of these changes are still being discussed, and there are further conversations that the BBC will have with others in due course."

Mr Vine described the move as a 'no-brainer', arguing: "I think it all needs to be sorted out, and I support my female colleagues who've rightly said they should be paid the same when they're doing the same job."

BBC revealed the salaries of its stars last summer after the corporation was forced by the British government to disclose the salaries.

The figures revealed a huge disparity between men and woman, with 17 men earning over £300,000 (€342,000), compared with seven women.

Just two of the top 10 earners were women - Claudia Winkleman and Alex Jones.

Earlier this month, one of the BBC's most experienced journalists quit her post, accusing the corporation of running a "secretive and illegal" pay structure.

In an open letter, China editor Carrie Gracie claimed to have discovered that male international news editors were being paid 'at least 50%' more than women in the same role.